You Don't Have to be Buddhist to Know Nothing: An Illustrious Collection of Thoughts on Naught

Author(s): Joan Konner

Spirituality

Whether a subject of dread or of fascination, nothing (often spelled with a capital 'N') has intrigued writers, philosophers, and scientists since ancient times. In this sound-bite history of the concept of nothing, distinguished journalist Joan Konner has created a unique anthology devoted to, well ...nothing. The collection brings together, in one portable volume, the thoughts of well-known writers and philosophers, artists and musicians, poets and playwrights, geniuses and jokers, demonstrating that some of the finest minds explored, feared, confronted, experienced, and played with the real or imagined presence of nothing in their lives. Paradoxical? Yes, indeed. This book shows that, like many Eastern sages, deep thinkers in the West also recognised and pondered non-existence as an essential component and complement of existence itself. Organised in short topical chapters from 'Knowing Nothing' to the 'Joy of Unknowing' and 'Nothing is Sacred', the verbal snapshots captured in this collection create a coherent work of insight, wisdom, humour and wonder. The book is compelling enough to be read all at once or in short bursts, as the spirit moves.

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"The quotes -- always insightful, sometimes wickedly funny--are by thinkers of all stripes, such as Sylvia Plath, Bob Dylan, Lao Tzu, and Shakespeare." -- Shambhala Sun, December 2009/January 2010

Preface; Introduction; Book I: Before; Book II: Here Goes Nothing; Book III: In Residence; Book IV: Public Library; Book V: Concert Hall; Book VI: School; Book VII: Museum; Book VIII: Theatre District; Book IX: House of Worship; Book X: Downtown; Book XI: City Limits.

General Fields

  • : 9781591027577
  • : Prometheus Books
  • : Prometheus Books
  • : January 2010
  • : United States
  • : books

Special Fields

  • : Joan Konner
  • : Hardback
  • : 111.5
  • : 332