For Indigenous Minds Only: A Decolonization Handbook

Author(s): Waziyatawin

Society & Culture

For Indigenous Minds Only features Indigenous scholars, writers, and activists who have collaborated for the creation of a sequel to For Indigenous Eyes Only (SAR Press, 2005).


The title reflects an understanding that decolonizing actions must begin in the mind, and that creative, consistent decolonised thinking shapes and empowers the brain, which in turn provides a major prime for positive change. Included in this book are discussions of global collapse, what to consider in returning to a land-based existence, demilitarisation for imperial purposes and re-militarisation for Indigenous purposes, survival strategies for tribal prisoners, moving beyond the nation-state model, a land-based educational model, personal decolonization, decolonisation strategies for youth in custody, and decolonising gender roles.


As with For Indigenous Eyes Only, the authors do not intend to provide universal solutions for problems stemming from centuries of colonialism. Rather, they hope to facilitate and encourage critical thinking skills while offering recommendations for fostering community discussions and plans for purposeful community action. For Indigenous Minds Only will serve an important need within Indigenous communities for years to come.

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Waziyatawin (formerly Angela Cavender Wilson) is a Dakota writer, teacher, and activist committed to the pursuit of Indigenous liberation and reclamation of homelands. Her work seeks to build a culture of resistance within Indigenous communities, to recover Indigenous ways of being, and to eradicate colonial institutions. She is currently writing on the topics of Indigenous women and resistance and Indigenous survival in the collapse of industrial civilization. Waziyatawin comes from the Pezihutazizi Otunwe (Yellow Medicine Village) in southwestern Minnesota. After receiving her Ph.D. in American history from Cornell University in 2000, she earned tenure and an associate professorship in the history department at Arizona State University where she taught for seven years. Waziyatawin currently holds the Indigenous Peoples Research Chair in the Indigenous Governance Program at the University of Victoria. She is the author or co/editor of six volumes, including What Does Justice Look Like? The Struggle for Liberation in Dakota Homeland (St. Paul: Living Justice Press, 2008), which won the 2009 Independent Publishers' Silver Book Award for Best Regional Non-Fiction in the Midwest.

General Fields

  • : 9781934691939
  • : SAR Press
  • : SAR Press
  • : December 2012
  • : United States
  • : books

Special Fields

  • : Waziyatawin
  • : Paperback
  • : 323.1197
  • : 284
  • : 9 figures, 2 tables